BACK JACK POSTERIOR DYNAMIC SPINE STABILIZATION PDS SURGERY

BACK JACK POSTERIOR DYNAMIC SPINE STABILIZATION PDS SURGERY

Back jack posterior dynamic spine stabilization PDS surgery with mesacanthion prefix for degenerative spine disorders: For degenerative spine disorders, DYNAMIC fusion is now preferred to stabilize the spine, wherever possible, in order not to lose the mobility of the spine. This is accomplished by placing an intermidiate prosthesis for posterior dynamic spinal column fixation.

 

Back jack posterior dynamic spine stabilization PDS surgery with mesacanthion prefix for degenerative spine disorders.

Back jack posterior dynamic spine stabilization PDS surgery with mesacanthion prefix for degenerative spine disorders.

 

What is the mesacanthion prefix?

 

The mesacanthion prefix is ​​a device, placed in the lumbar spine between, as its name implies, in the spinous apophysis of the vertebrae, and acts both as a "pillow" and as a "separation" of the vertebral bodies.

 

The dynamic lumbar fusion stabilization with a mesacanthion prefix: Indications for the placement of the mesacanthion prefix.

 

The indications for the placement of the mesacanthion prefix are:

 

  • In combination with Microdiscectomy MIS to "protect" the intervertebral disc and avoid hernia recurrence (intervertebral disc herniation).
  • In cases of small lateral herniated intervertebral disc narrowing the intervertebral foram and pushing the nerve.
  • In degenerative spondylolisthisis no greater than 1 degree associated with neurogenic intermittent claudication.
  • In a black disc and degenerated pain (Syndrome after discectomy or degeneration of the intervertebral disc).
  • Lumbar pain due to "load".
  • "Painful joint surfaces" syndrome.
  • In lumbar stenosis.

 

Back jack posterior dynamic spine stabilization PDS surgery with mesacanthion prefix for degenerative spine disorders - Advantages

 

Advantages of placing the dynamic lumbar fusion stabilization with a mesacanthion prefix are:

 

  • Minimally invasive surgery.
  • Unilateral placement, so minimizing surgical trauma.
  • Preservation of the posterior mesacanthion ligament.
  • Minimal chance of receding / shifting of the prefix.
  • Small operating time.
  • Anatomical method and not catastrophic, while maintaining other surgical approaches.

 

Back jack posterior dynamic spine stabilization PDS surgery with mesacanthion prefix for degenerative spine disorders – How is the mesacanthion placed?

 

The patient is placed in a prone position in a special bed, or alternatively in a lateral position.

 

Anesthesia is:

 

  • local injection of drugs,
  • light anesthesia with analgesia or and
  • epidural anesthesia in selected cases, depending on the co-morbid health problems.

 

Prophylactic antibiotics are administered.

 

The location where the prefix will be placed is ​​determined by C-arm x-ray and then a 3 cm section is made through which the prefix is placed after the field has been prepared. Then the location is confirmed again by x-ray and the wound is closed.


Dynamic lumbar fusion stabilization with a mesacanthion prefix for posterior dynamic stabilization. Back Jack Confirmation.

Dynamic lumbar fusion stabilization with a mesacanthion prefix for posterior dynamic stabilization. Back Jack Confirmation.

 

 

The procedure lasts 15 minutes and the patient can leave the hospital the same afternoon.

 

The patient will need to take antibiotics and painkillers for a few days depending on co-existing health problems.

 

Back jack posterior dynamic spine stabilization PDS surgery with mesacanthion prefix for degenerative spine disorders – Postoperative course and recovery stage.

 

It is very important for the patient to return to his daily activities during the post-operative recovery after a dynamic lumbar fusion stabilization with a mesacanthion prefix. A rehabilitation program is usually recommended, depending on the age, general health of the patient and its physical condition. The patient is encouraged to gradually resume his activities.

 

It is recommended to avoid heavy weight lifting in the first 6 weeks after the operation, however walking is recommended immediately postoperatively. After a couple of weeks, a dorsum muscle strengthening program can be started in line with the tolerance of the individual patient.

 

 
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